Muhglai Paratha with Spicy Potato Mixture

Being stationed in North India, which can unarguably be regarded as “land of parathas”, I come across every possible kind of parathas to be imagined and you start to doubt if anything more can be done with them. Today, however, I present you a very different and one of its kind of paratha,  with a history going back decades in the past and known as Mughlai Paratha. As the name suggests, adored by the Mughals, ideally Mughlai Paratha is stuffed with egg, mutton keema and sometimes with fish minces to be served with salads and potato curries. Pretty heavy for being categorized as a snack, mughlai paratha is  indeed a fulll fledged non-vegeterian dish which finds a huge fan following in East India, particularly in and around Calcutta. Try it out to know that Parathas can be more than what we can imagine.

Mughlai Paratha with Spicy Potato Mixture

Mughlai Paratha with Spicy Potato Mixture

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Idli

Today I am here with the recipe of a very common and immensely popular south Indian dish of Idli. It remained in my “To Do” list for a long long time. Partially due to the absence of Idli mould and then because of my infamous laziness, I managed to come up with this dish so late. I always think of Idlis as steamed cakes, made of fermented rice and black gram lentils which one can have either in breakfast or even in lunch. Its batter is quite similar to ‘dosa’ batter except it being a bit thicker. You can try out this healthy dish at your own to feel the flavour of south India at will.

Idli with Sambar & Coconut chutney

Idli with Sambar & Coconut chutney

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Dahi Vada

After a long sabbatical of almost three months, I again find my calling here to share with you a well known snack “Dahi Vada”. Originated sometimes during the 12th century, in the present day Karnataka, as Dahi Vada kept on making fans all over India, it can hardly be called a South Indian Snack. Found in every corner of India these days, Dahi Vada plays a multi-purpose role, from being a filler to starter and from a party dish to a road-side delight. I am also in sheer love with this fried dumpling of lentils dunked in yogurt with a topping of bhujia. An absolute pleasure sharing this recipe.

Dahi Vada

Dahi Vada

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Methi Paratha or Fenugreek leaves Paratha

I have started a new phase of my life in Delhi six months back. Again a new city, new people around with some interesting foods to explore 🙂 Though Delhi is famous for its Mughlai food, I bet one would love the parathas available here, even in small road side stalls. In old Delhi, there is one famous and well known street named “Parathe wala gali” where you can find every possible variety of partahas. Can one imagine Parathas can be stuffed with Rabri and this ‘Rabri Paratha’ is something one can die for !!! Left insanely inspired, I have added a number of parathas in my to do kitty among which today I am sharing a very simple and common one which is ‘Methi Paratha’ or Fenugreek leaves paratha. The recipe is pretty simple and lot easier than other stuffed parathas. Enjoy 🙂

Methi Paratha or Fenugreek Leaves Paratha

Methi Paratha or Fenugreek Leaves Paratha

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Chhatur Parota or Sattu Paratha

Sattu or Chatu (in Bengali) is a flour of dry roasted grains such as barley, bengal gram, millet, corn etc. In Bihar sattu is used extensively in different sweet and savoury dishes. They generally use the sattu of bengal gram. Whereas in Punjab barley sattu is much popular. One can easily confuse Sattu with bengal gram flour or besan. The former is a fiber rich and nutritious food. One glass of water mixed with sattu, salt, sugar and lemon juice is a healthy and energetic start for a day.

Till date I have tasted two dishes of Bihar – one is sattu paratha, made by my mother and second one is litti, prepared by a Bihari guy I met in Germany. Although both have been delicious, my favourite is the paratha. Again this recipe, which I share with you is stolen from my mother’s cook book 🙂 😉

Chatur Parota/Sattu Paratha

Chatur Parota/Sattu Paratha

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Vegetable Upma/Nonta Suji

It has always been our priority to start a day with healthy breakfast. At the same time, these days, leading fast lives, we can’t afford to go for a lengthy recipe. Although our taste bud always look for something different from regular bread and butter. Vegetable Upma, a savoury dish mainly with semolina and few vegetables, would be a great option for a healthy yet tasty breakfast. Althoug a South Indian delicacy, it is quite similar to our daily food and we Bengalis often call it “Nonta Suji”, ‘nonta’ means savoury and ‘suji’ stands for semolina. My mother used to make it often for breakfast and even for lunch during my school days. The present recipe is very simple and pretty similar to the usual upma recipe. So have it and stay healthy 🙂

Vegetable Upma or Nonta Suji

Vegetable Upma or Nonta Suji

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Ganjorer Parota/Carrot Paratha

Carrot, largely a winter vegetable, is used in many savoury dishes, currys and even in salads. Again Carrot halwa is a very popular Indian dessert, perhaps adored by all. For me , I love to use carrot in many of my dishes, just because its colour brings vibrancy in the appearance. However, this time I gave it a completely different treatment and made carrot paratha. When potato, cauliflower, spinach, radish etc. can be used as stuffing for parathas, why can’t be carrot ????? Today I prepared it for the first time and it came out just brilliant.  So, you can try a new version of paratha this winter to make your loved ones happy 🙂

Carrot Paratha

Carrot Paratha

Ingredients for 6 Parathas :

For Dough :

  1. Plain flour – 1¼ cup
  2. Pinch of salt
  3. Sugar – ½ teaspoon
  4. Oil – 1 tbspoon

For Stuffing :

  1. Carrot (grated) – 2 (medium size)
  2. Ginger paste – ½ tbspoon
  3. Cumin powder – ½ tbspoon
  4. Red chilli powder – ½ teaspoon
  5. Garam masala powder – ¼ teaspoon
  6. Salt & sugar to taste
  7. Cooking oil – 1-2 tbspoon

Procedure :

Mix flour, salt, sugar and oil in a large bowl. Add lukewarm water, little at a time to make a soft dough. Knead the dough for few minutes until it is smooth. Keep it aside in an air tight container for at least 10 minutes.

Heat oil a frying pan over medium flame. Add grated carrot and cook until it becomes soft.

Then add ginger paste, chilli powder, cumin powder, salt and sugar. Cook until oil separates form the mixture.

Then add garam masala powder, give it a good stir and put the gas off. Let the mixture come to room temperature and then divide into 6 equal parts.

Also divide the dough into 6 equal parts and make flat round balls out of them by rolling between palms.

Flatten each ball by pressing with finger and make a cavity at the center of the ball (try to flatten them through edges, don’t let the center too thin). Now place one part of the carrot mixture in this cavity and close it from all sides, again roll between your palms to get a flat round shaped ball. Stuff remaining five balls with carrot mixture the same way.

Stuffing the balls

Stuffing the balls

Now roll each stuffed ball, on an oily work surface, into circle of 13 -15 cm. diameter or in a size of small roti or paratha.

Heat a tawa or flat frying pan over medium flame. Place the paratha on hot tawa/pan and bake for few seconds, flip it and bake the other side for few seconds. Then add 1 tbspoon of oil and fry evenly both sides of paratha till it gets nice golden colour.

Serve hot with Spicy Beetroot Curry.

Hot Carrot Paratha with Spicy Beetroot Curry

Hot Carrot Paratha with Spicy Beetroot Curry

Aloo Paratha

Parathas are anonymous with North Indian breakfasts. The heavily stuffed hot parathas with a piece of melting butter is nothing short of  heaven  for the tongue. The stuffing is an art too. Perhaps you have heard the legends of ‘paratha wali gali’ in Old Delhi, famous for varieties of stuffing with every possible edible thing on earth 😉 . I am not going too much into that, instead share with you the simplest Paratha recipe, the aloo paratha aka paratha with Potato stuffing. I often prepare it in breakfast or dinner. You can customize the potato stuffing according to your taste.

Aloo Paratha

Aloo Paratha

Ingredients for 5 Paratha:

  1. Plain flour – ½ cup
  2. Wheat flour – ½ cup
  3. Boiled potato (large)- 2
  4. Chopped green chilli – 2
  5. Chopped coriander leaves – 2 tbspoon
  6. Ajwain/carom seed – ¾ teaspoon
  7. Chat masala – 1½ teaspoon
  8. Salt to taste
  9. Cooking oil

Procedure :

Mix wheat and plain flour in a large bowl. Add pinch of salt and 1 tbspoon of oil in it, mix well. Add lukewarm water, little at a time to make a soft dough. Knead the dough for few minutes until it is smooth. Keep it aside in an air tight container for at least 10 minutes.

Meanwhile prepare the spicy potato mixture for stuffing. Mash the potato in a bowl, add carom seed, chat masala, salt, green chilli and coriander leaves. Mix them very well and divide into 5 equal parts.

Divide the dough into five equal parts and make flat round balls out of them by rolling between palms.

Flatten each ball by pressing with finger and make a cavity at the center of the ball (try to flatten them through edges, don’t let the center too thin). Now place one part of the potato mixture in this cavity and close it from all sides, again roll between your palms to get a flat round shaped ball. Stuff remaining four balls with potato mixture the same way.

Now roll each stuffed ball, on a floured work surface, into a circle of 16 -18 cm. diameter or in a size of roti or paratha.

Heat a tawa or flat frying pan over medium flame. Place the paratha on hot tawa/pan and bake for few seconds, flip it and bake the other side for few seconds. Then add 1 tbspoon of oil and fry evenly both sides of paratha till it gets nice golden colour.

Serve hot topped with small piece of butter or any pickle.

Note :

  1. I used both wheat flour and plain flour. You can make the paratha only with wheat flour or plain flour according to your preference.
  2. If you don’t have chat masala use dry roasted mixture of cumin powder, coriander powder and garam masala powder. Amchur powder or mango powder can also be added.

Luchi o Alu Chachchori / Puri with simple Potato curry

We the Bengalis know the plain puris by a cuter name, “luchi”.  For us, Luchi with potato curry is a fascinating combo for Sunday breakfast to kick start the lazy morning with an utmost luxury. The truth is that both the plain puris and the potato curry are individually very unassuming, still together they are very special and instantly create a magic. Luchis are equally lucrative with Dam Aloo and Mutton Curry too.

Luchi o Alu Chachchori

Luchi o Alu Chachchori

Ingredients for 10 – 12 luchi/puri :

  1. Plain flour – 1 cup
  2. Sunflower oil – 1 tbspoon
  3. Pinch of salt
  4. Luke warm water – approx. 1/3 cup
  5. Sunflower oil for deep frying (approx. 2 cup)

Ingredients for Alu Chachchori/Potato curry (serves 2) :

  1. Potato (large size) – 2
  2. Slit green chilli – 2
  3. Black cumin seed (kala jeera) – ½ teaspoon
  4. Turmeric powder – ¼ teaspoon
  5. Salt & Sugar to taste
  6. Cooking oil (preferably mustard oil) – 1 tbspoon

Procedure for Puris :

Mix together 1 tbspoon of oil, salt and flour very well in a large bowl. The process of mixing oil with flour for making puri or paratha dough is called “Moyan” in Bengali.

Then add lukewarm water to the flour, little at a time, to make a dough. Knead the dough with your hand until it is smooth in texture. Puri dough should neither be very soft nor hard.

Keep the dough aside for 30 minutes in an air tight container.

Then divide the dough into 10 or 12 equal parts and roll them between your plums to give flat round shape.

Now roll each flat ball into a circle (maximum 10 cm. in diameter) on a oily work surface.

Heat sufficient amount of oil in a pan over medium flame and fry the puris when the oil is moderately hot.

Procedure for Potato curry :

Peel and cut the potatoes into medium size cubes.

Heat oil in a pan over medium flame. Add black cumin seeds and green chillies. Saute for a while and then add potato cubes. Sprinkle over salt and turmeric powder and fry till the potatoes get half cooked. Then add 1 cup of water and sugar, give it a good stir. Cover the pan with a lid and let it cook for few minutes. Put the gas off as potatoes are completely cooked and gravy thickens. The gravy should not be very watery.

Serve hot hot puries with potato curry. 🙂

 

Chirer Pulao / Flaked Rice Pulao

“Chirer pulao” or Flaked rice pulao is a handy breakfast or evening snack dish. I used to find often my lunch box full of “chirer pulao” in the good old school days. These days I often prepare it as evening snack when my husband returns home from work and I need to make something very quick. It indeed can be made in a blink of an eye. So just try and share your experience with me. 🙂

Chirer Pulao or Flaked rice Pulao

Chirer Pulao or Flaked rice Pulao

Ingredients to serve 2 :

  1. Flaked rice/Chire – 2 cup
  2. Thin slices of carrot – 2 tbspoon
  3. Small cubes of potato – 1
  4. Finely chopped onion – 1
  5. Finely chopped ginger – ½ tbspoon
  6. Chopped green chilli – 2
  7. Roasted pea nut – 2 tbspoon
  8. Salt and sugar to taste
  9. Oil – 3 tbspoon

Procedure :

Wash flaked rice twice and drain the water well. Then spread it over a plate to become just a little bit dry.

Heat oil in a pan over medium flame. Add sliced carrot and potato and fry for 2-3 minutes. Then add chopped onion, ginger, green chilli and pea nuts. Season with salt and fry till all the vegetables get cooked.

Now add the flaked rice, season with salt and sugar and fry very well till the raw flavour of flaked rice disappears.

Serve hot.

Note :

  1. For this recipe fine flaked rice is not suitable as after rinsing it turns mushy. Then it turns out unmanageable even if you fry for long.
  2. Don’t fry the flaked rice for a long time otherwise it will become hard and crispy which is not desirable for this dish.

Medu Vada

Medu vada is a quintessential South Indian snack. Along with Idli and Dosa, Vada holds a symbolic status in South Indian variety of foods, lauded all over India. Although I do not have much experience with South Indian cuisine, still I love to prepare different dishes, particularly the ones which are pretty well-known. Vada has been in the queue for long, and I get the best opportunity as I find excess Urad dal, the primary component of Vada, which I soaked for some different purpose. The outcome was fairly satisfying looking at my first attempt and had it in breakfast. I assume Vada is not necessarily a breakfast snack, rather can be prepared anytime of the day you want.

Medu vada with Sambar

Medu vada with Sambar

Ingredients for 10 – 12 pieces :

  1. Skinless urad dal – ½ cup
  2. Finely chopped onion – ½
  3. Chopped green chilli – 1 or 2
  4. Chopped coriander leaves – 2 tbspoon heaped
  5. Chopped curry leaves – 1 tbspoon heaped
  6. Asafoetida powder – ¼ teaspoon
  7. Cumin seeds – ½ teaspoon
  8. Salt to taste
  9. Oil for deep frying

Procedure :

Wash and soak the urad dal in water for 8 – 10 hours.

Then drain the excess water from the dal and make a smooth paste of it in a blender. While making the paste try to use as little of water as possible. The paste needs to be very thick.

Now beat the dal paste very well with hand in circular motion to let air go into it. This step is important to get a fluffy vada.

Now mix all other ingredients except oil with the paste.

Heat sufficient amount of oil in a deep frying pan over medium heat.

Take a bowl full of chilled water. Dip your hand in this water and then take a small portion of the batter, make a hole at the centre with your thumb and add to the hot oil.

You can fry more than one vada at a time according to your pan size. Keep the flame on low to medium.

Turn the vadas as they start changing colour and don’t disturb them while frying. Don’t try to turn the vada immediately after adding it to the hot oil, otherwise it will lose its shape.

Fry till vadas turn golden in colour and looks nicely cooked allover.

Dip your hand in water whenever you feel the batter is sticking to your hand.

Transfer them into paper towel to absorb the excess oil.

Medu vadas ready to be served

Medu vadas ready to be served

Serve with sambar and coconut chatney.

For the recipe of Sambar & Coconut chutney look into my post, Masala Dosa with Sambar & Coconut chutney. This time I made Sambar with Masoor dal instead of Chana dal & Mung dal, which also turns out really delicious. To save your time you can also do that. 🙂 I skip the coconut chutnye which you should not emulate. 😉

Note :

  1. I have prepared small size vadas, you can choose the size according to your preference.
  2. You can add 1 tbspoon rice flour or even plain flour if your batter seems to be runny.

 

 

 

Radhaballavi with Cholar dal – My first Guest Post for ãhãram

I got a wonderful opportunity to do my first guest post for my loving blogger friend Aruna of ãhãram. During the course of blog writing we came to know each other and become very good friends. She has a versatile blog full of recipes from different parts of the world. You should visit her blog to look for those at aahaaram.wordpress.com.

Thank you very much Aruna for introducing my blog to a new group of foodies.

Aruna has a special connection to Bengalis and passion for Bengali foods. When I post the recipe of Karaisutir Kochuri or Peas Puri she expressed her fondness for it. Over the chat she got to know about Radhaballavi from me and asked me to share its recipe in form of a guest post for her blog.

Now few words about “Radhaballavi”. This sweet named dish is nothing but puris filled with urad dal stuffing. It goes very well with Cholar dal or Chana dal and Alur Dom.  Aloo Matar Paneer, which is my recent post, can be a good match as well. In Kolkata, people on their way back from daily bazar in the morning, often flock infront of sweet shops to have a quick Radhaballavi while others pack them to home for a good breakfast. Some of these sweet shops are selling Radhabalavi for many years and well known to keep up the traditional custom  and taste.

If you are bored of having usual puris, radhaballavi can be a welcome change.

Radhaballavi with Cholar dal

Radhaballavi with Cholar dal

Ingredients for 7 – 8 Radhaballavi :

For Stuffing :

  1. Skinless urad dal – ½ cup
  2. Green chilli – 1 or 2
  3. Ginger paste – ½ tbspoon
  4. Black cumin seed – ½ teaspoon
  5. Fennel seed – ½ teaspoon
  6. Asafoetida or hing (powder) – ½ teaspoon
  7. Pinch of turmeric powder
  8. Salt to taste
  9. Cooking oil – 2 tbspoon

For dough :

  1. Plain flour – 1 cup
  2. Sugar – ½ teaspoon
  3. Asafoetida or hing (powder) – ½ teaspoon
  4. Pinch of salt
  5. Oil – 1 tbspoon
  6. Lukewarm water

Ingredients for Cholar dal or Chana dal :

  1. Chana Dal or Cholar dal – 2/3 cup
  2. Chopped tomato (medium) – ½
  3. Ginger paste – ½ tbspoon
  4. Small pieces of coconut – 2 – 3 tbspoon
  5. Lengthwise sliced green chilli – 2
  6. Cumin seed – ½ teaspoon
  7. Whole garam masala (Cinnamon stick – ½ inch, Clove – 2, Cardamom – 2)
  8. Bay leaf – 1
  9. Turmeric powder – ¼ teaspoon
  10. Salt & sugar to taste
  11. Cooking oil – 1tbspoon

    Ingredients for Cholar dal/Chana dal

    Ingredients for Cholar dal/Chana dal

Procedure :

Making of Filling/Stuffing for the puris :

 Wash and soak the urad dal for few hours in water. Then drain the water and grind the dal by adding salt and green chillies. Add little water if needed, the paste should not be watery.

Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add black cumin seeds, let it splutter and then add the urad dal paste and turmeric powder. Fry the dal until it’s raw flavour goes away.

Now transfer the fried dal in a bowl and mix with ginger paste, asafoetida and fennel seeds using hand. Now your filling is done, let it cool down at room temperature .

Making of Dough :

Shift flour, salt, sugar, asafoetida and oil in a big bowl and mix them very well. Add lukewarm water, little at a time, to combine all the ingredients. Knead the dough very well to give it a semi-soft texture. Leave the dough for at least 30 minutes in an air tight container.

Making of Radhaballavi/Puri :

Divide the dough into 7 or 8 equal parts and round them between your palms. Radhaballavi is bigger in size than puri, so make the balls a bit bigger than puri balls.

Flatten each ball evenly by your fingers to make a hole in the ball, put 1 tbpoon of the spicy urad dal stuffing, close it from all sides and again roll them between your palms.

Stuffing with the urad dal mixture

Stuffing with the urad dal mixture

Now roll the stuffed balls, by a rolling pin, on an oily work surface to make a circular shape, slightly bigger than that of puris.

Now heat sufficient amount of oil in a frying pan over medium heat and fry the puris in it. I don’t like my puris to be brown in colour, so I don’t fry them for too long. You can fry the puris according to your preference.

Radhaballavi is ready to serve

Radhaballavi is ready to be served

Making of Cholar dal/Chana dal :

Wash the chana dal and pressure cook it, adding water, upto 3 to 4 whistles. Do not throw away the water soon after boiling the dal.

Heat the oil in a large pan over medium flame. Add whole garam masala, cumin seeds and bay leaf, saute them for a while and then add the coconut pieces. Fry the coconut till light brown in colour and then add ginger paste, chopped tomato, green chillies, turmeric powder and salt. Cook till tomato gets softened and raw flavour of ginger goes away. Now add the boiled chana dal with water, season with sugar and salt (if needed), also add extra water if needed. Now let it boil for few minutes so that the dal gets the flavour of other ingredients. Put the gas off as the dal thickens to your desired consistency. It should not have a very thin gravy.

Cholar dal or Chana dal

Cholar dal or Chana dal

Now serve the Radhaballavi with Cholar dal and enjoy. 🙂

Note :

  1. While frying the urad dal paste, don’t fry it for too long, otherwise it will get hard.
  2. The oil should be moderately hot when you are going to fry the puris. If your oil temperature is low, your puri will not rise well. On the other hand, if the oil temperature is too high, your puris may get burnt.
  3. While boiling the chana dal make sure it does not get mushy. It should be cooked still holds it’s structure well.
  4. If you are using solid asafoetida/hing instead of powder, then use a pinch of it as it is more stronger than the powdered one.

Masala Dosa with Sambar & Coconut chutney

Dosa is perhaps the most symbolic South Indian food. Whenever one mentions South Indian dishes, the first picture comes to your vision is that of a Dosa with Sambar and Chutney, its well-suited complementaries. From the point of view of western foodies, Dosa can be regarded as a savoury pan cake rolled around a super delicious potato curry. Dosa, although a South Indian delicacy, finds fan following all over India.

I myself, not being a great fan of dosa never thought to prepare it at home. Still I took up the challenge with the pursuance of my husband,  to try my hand at this which turned out to be a success. Undoubtedly, the process is quite lengthy which needs quite a long list of ingredients, still the end product worths all the hard work.

Ideally the size of Dosa is quite large. However, since I do not possess that large equipments (tawa), I had to be satisfied with a miniature version, which nevertheless was equally crispy and tasty as the original ones.So, with full humility, I dedicate the recipe to all Dosa fans.

Masala Dosa with Sambar & Coconut chutney

Masala Dosa with Sambar & Coconut chutney

Ingredients for 15 mini Dosas :

For Dosa batter

  1. Rice – 1 cup
  2. Urad dal or Skinless Black Gram lentils – 1/3 cup
  3. Flaked rice – 1/3 cup
  4. Fenugreek seed or Methi – 1/3 tbspoon
  5. Water as required
  6. Salt to taste

For Sambar

  1. Mung dal – ¼ cup
  2. Chana dal or split chickpeas – ¼ cup
  3. Chopped Onion – 1
  4. Small pieces of Carrot – ½
  5. Medium size pieces of Green Beans – 4 to 5
  6. Medium size pieces of Drumsticks – 2
  7. Chopped Tomato – ½
  8. Grated Coconut – 3 tbspoon
  9. Curry leaves – 8 to 10
  10. Black Mustard seed – ½ teaspoon
  11. Turmeric powder – ¼ teaspoon
  12. Sambar Garam masala powder – 1 teaspoon
  13. Ginger paste – ½ tbspoon
  14. Green chilli paste – ½ tbspoon
  15. Tamarind pulp as per your taste
  16. Salt to taste
  17. Oil – 2 tbspoon

For Spicy Potato Mixture

  1. Boiled Potato – 3 large
  2. Green peas
  3. Chopped Onion – 1
  4. Ginger paste – ½ tbspoon
  5. Chopped Green Chilli – 2
  6. Pinch of Turmeric powder
  7. Cumin powder – ½ teaspoon
  8. Coriander powder – ½ teaspoon
  9. Mustard seed – ½ tbspoon
  10. Curry leaves – 8 to 10
  11. Salt to taste
  12. Chopped Coriander leaves (optional)
  13. Oil – 2 tbspoon

For Coconut Chutney

  1. Grated coconut – 5 to 6 tbspoon
  2. Ginger – ½ inch piece
  3. Green chilli – 1 to 2
  4. Yogurt – 2 tbspoon
  5. Few Coriander leaves (optional)
  6. Salt & Sugar to taste (sugar is optional)
  7. Mustard seeds – ½ tbspoon
  8. Red chilli – 2
  9. Curry leaves – 5 to 6
  10. Oil – 1½ tbspoon

Procedure :

Preparation of Dosa batter 

Wash and soak the rice, dal/lentils and fenugreek seeds in water over night.

Wash and soak the flaked rice in minimum amount of water for 30 minutes before making the paste.

Now take out the additional water from all the ingredients and reserve the water for later use. Make a smooth paste with rice, lentils, flaked rice and fenugreek seeds in a blender. Add small amount of reserved water if needed. Don’t make a thin paste.

Transfer the paste in a large bowl. Add salt to the mixture, cover the bowl and let the mixture ferment for at least 6 – 8 hours. I will recommend to ferment your batter for 8 hours to get a soft and crispy dosa.

After the fermentation, mix the batter very well, add water if it is too thick. The batter should be in pouring consistency.

Dosa batter

Dosa batter

Preparation of Sambar

While the batter is fermenting lets prepare other supplementaries.

To get the tamarind pulp, take some warm water and soak the tamarind in it for 30 mins. Once the tamarind gets soft, then squeeze the tamarind and remove the pulp. Strain it later.

Wash the mung dal and chana dal with water. Pressure cook them upto 4 whistles or until they are mushy. Then mash them completely either with a hand blender or in a mixer or simply by a “dal ghotni”.

Heat oil in a large pan over medium flame. Add mustard seeds and let it splutter.

Then add onion and fry until translucent. Add other vegetables and fry till they get mostly cooked.

Now add tomato, ginger paste, chilli paste, salt, turmeric powder, grated coconut and curry leaves. Cook for another few minutes and then pour the mashed dal into the vegetable mixture.

Add water to make the sambar at your desired consistency. Add sugar (optional), sambar garam masala and tamarind pulp to it. Let it boil for few minutes. Now sambar is ready to serve.

Sambar

Sambar

Preparation of Spicy Potato mixture

Roughly mash the boiled potato by hand.

Heat oil in a frying pan over medium flame. Add mustard seeds, let it splutter.

Add onion and fry till it gets translucent. Add ginger paste and saute it for a while.

Now add the mashed potato onto it.

Add salt, turmeric, cumin & coriander powder, green chillies, green peas and curry leaves into it. Mix them very well and fry for few minutes so that the flavour of these ingredients incorporate in the potato very well.

Put the gas off and add the coriander leaves but it is completely optional.

Spicy Potato Mixture

Spicy Potato Mixture

Preparation of Coconut Chutney

Grind the grated coconut, ginger, green chilli and coriander leaves along with yogurt, salt and sugar to make a smooth paste.

Heat oil in a small pan, add mustard seeds and red chillies into it. Let the mustard seeds splutter and then add the curry leaves. Stir for a while and put the gas off. Now tamper the coconut paste with this mixture.

Coconut chutney

Coconut chutney

Making of Dosa

Put the “tawa” over very low flame. For making dosa you need your tawa to be just warm, not hot. That’s why after making each dosa sprinkle little amount of cold water over the tawa to bring its temperature down and sweep the water off with a clean cloth. It your tawa becomes too hot then put it under the cold running water.

Take the batter in a big ladle and pour at the centre of warm tawa. Spread the batter form the center to edges by making small circular motions by the bottom of the ladle.

Making of Dosa

Making of Dosa

Now sprinkle little amount of oil around the edge of the dosa and cook it for few minutes. Oil gives the dosa golden brown colour althoug it is optional.

Dosa is cooked by only one side. As it gets cooked put the filling i.e. the potato mixture at the center of the dosa and fold it form both sides.

Masala dosa is ready to serve :)

Masala dosa is ready to serve 🙂

Now enjoy your dosa with sambar and coconut chutney. 🙂

Note :

  1. Always take rice and lentils in 3:1 proportion.
  2. Flaked rice makes dosa soft.
  3. Give the dosa batter sufficient time to get fermented otherwise your dosa will not be quite crispy.
  4. Always bring down the temperature of the tawa otherwise it will be tough for you to make dosa.

 

 

 

 

Karaisutir Kochuri or Peas Puri

Nothing beats the idea of  starting the lazy Sunday morning with a breakfast of puris or luchi with Dum Aloo (spicy potato curry). However, puris can be of different kind and known as kachori, bhatura , nun etc. Among all, Peas Puri is my favourtie.

Since fresh peas used to be available only in winter months in India, Peas Puri was more of a winter delicacy. I still relish the memory of my mother preparing this while waiting seemed too long for me. My expertise in the whole process, however was limited to peeling off the peas back then. Now it is indeed a bit arduous to prepare all by myself, but the end result is worthy. Here goes the recipe of peas puri which you will not be tired of trying again and again.

Karaisutir Kochuri/Peas Puri with Aloor dum

Karaisutir Kochuri/Peas Puri with Aloor dum

Ingredients for 20 pieces of puri :

For stuffing :

  1. Green peas – 1½ cup
  2. Ginger – ½ inch piece
  3. Green chillies – 2
  4. Asafoetida powder (Hing) – ½ teaspoon
  5. Cumin powder – ½ teaspoon
  6. Coriander powder – ½ teaspoon
  7. Garam masala powder – ½ teaspoon
  8. Salt & sugar to taste
  9. Cooking oil – 3 tbspoon

For dough :

  1. Plain flour – 2½ cup
  2. Pinch of salt
  3. Lukewarm Water – 2/3 cup (approx.)
  4. Oil – 2 tbspoon

Extra oil for frying the puris.

Procedure :

To prepare the dough, take the flour in a large bowl and mix it well with salt and oil. Now add water little at a time and make a soft dough, knead the dough very well. It should not be very soft like “roti” dough, rather should be little firm like a puri dough. Keep it aside in an air tight container for at least 30 minutes.

Meanwhile grind the peas with ginger, green chillies, salt and sugar in a mixer grinder and make a coarse paste.

Coarse paste of Peas

Coarse paste of Peas

Heat 3 tbspoon of oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add asafoetida into the hot oil and then the paste of peas. Stir the mixture well, gradually add all the spices and cook until the raw flavour of peas goes away and the mixture attains the texture to be used as a stuffing. Now let the mixture cool.

Stuffing is ready

Stuffing is ready

Now divide the dough into 20 equal size balls and roll them between your palms. Flatten each ball evenly by your fingers to make a hole in the ball, put 1 teaspoon full of the peas stuffing, close it from all sides and again roll them between your palms.

Stuffing process

Stuffing process

Now coat each ball with little amount of flour and roll them in a size of puri with a rolling-pin on work surface. Don’t give much pressure while rolling the stuffed balls as the stuffing may come out from the dough. Dust the flour off very well from the surface of puris before frying.

Now heat sufficient amount of oil for deep-frying and fry the puris in it. I don’t like my puris to be brown in colour, so I don’t fry them for too long. You can fry the puris according to your preference. All of my puris turned out absolutely round shaped as appear in the picture, so I was very happy and amused too. 🙂

Frying the stuffed puris in oil

Frying the stuffed puris in oil

Now you are ready to serve the mouthwatering peas puris. I like to eat it without any side dish to relish the flavour the peas, but you can serve it with “dum aloo” or “aloor dum” (for the recipe look into my post Dum Aloo ).

Peas puris are ready to serve

Peas puris are ready to serve 🙂

Note :

  1. You can roll the puris with oil instead of flour if you find it not too difficult for you. Most of the time I have trouble as stuffing comes out from the dough while rolling with oil.
  2. If you are using solid asafoetida instead of powder, then add a pinch of it while grinding the green peas.
  3. Try to use fresh green peas.

Khaman Dhokla

Khaman Dhokla is a traditional dish of Gujrat, a western state of India. There are different kinds of “dhokla” that can be eaten as breakfast, main course, side dish or as a snacks. Generally dhokla is made from rice and chickpea splits, whereas Khaman dhokla is prepared only by Gram flour or Besan, pulse flour made from ground chickpeas. It is more fluffier, lighter and softer than other dhoklas.

This is my 3rd attempt to make Khaman dhokla at home to bring a bit change in our daily breakfast routine. First two attempts were not turned out good and I must share why. Actually, in my first attempt I did not have ‘Eno’ or any other fruit salts, the key ingredient of this recipe; so I used baking powder, which did not bring the best of results. While in the second attempt the steaming process was not perfect. To make dhokla, one needs some reagent which will raise the batter immediately. I don’t think even sodium bicarbonate will do this work properly. So Eno seems to be quite indispensable for this recipe.

You also need a round, deep steel plate to prepare dhokla. I didn’t have that, so I used my 7 inch cake tin.

At last steaming should be in proper way. If you have a Dhokla steamer, nothing is better than that. If no, then follow the instructions I have given here and enjoy the super delicious Khaman Dhokla. 🙂

Delicious Khaman Dhokla

Delicious Khaman Dhokla

Ingredients :

For batter :

  1. Besan or Chickpea flour/Bengal Gram flour – 1 cup
  2. Suji or Semolina – 1½ tbspoon
  3. Green chilli & ginger paste – 1 tbspoon
  4. Lemon juice – 1 tbspoon
  5. Sugar – 1½ tbspoon
  6. Eno’s fruit salt – 1½ teaspoon
  7. Cooking oil – 1 tbspoon
  8. Salt to taste
  9. Pinch of turmeric
  10. Water – 1 cup

For tamarind chatni (optional) :

  1. Tamarind pulp – 2 tbspoon
  2. Mustard seed – ¼ teaspoon
  3. Chilli powder – ¼ teaspoon
  4. Ginger powder – ¼ teaspoon or Ginger juice – ½ teaspoon
  5. Salt & sugar to taste.
  6. Oil – ¼ tbspoon

For tempering & garnishing :

  1. Oil – 2 tbspoon
  2. Mustard seed – ½ teaspoon
  3. Green chilli (sliced lengthwise) – 2
  4. Fresh curry leaves – 12 – 15
  5. sugar – 1 teaspoon
  6. salt to taste
  7. Water – ½ cup
  8. Grated coconut for garnishing

Procedure :

To prepare batter, mix all the dry ingredients except Eno’s fruit salt in a bowl. Now keep adding little amount of water at a time to make a lump free batter. Add chilli-ginger paste, lemon juice and oil into it and mix them well. Leave the batter for 10 minutes. At this point the batter seems to be little watery.

Meanwhile grease the cake tin or steel plate with oil. Put a large and deep pan, with a diameter larger than that of cake tin/plate, on stove over medium flame. Place a “hot-pan stand” into it and pour 2½ cup of water or more, according to your pan size (water level should not reach to the top of the “stand”). Cover the pan and let the water boil. If there is any hole in the lid of your pan then seal it with flour dough (make an air tight condition any how). Now the arrangement works as a hot water chamber or steamer.

Now add Eno’s fruit salt into your batter and mix it well. As you add this key ingredient, you can see the batter becomes very fluffy and almost double in volume in no time. Immediately pour the batter into the cake tin/plate.

Dokla batter in the cake tin

Dokla batter in the cake tin

Now place the cake tin/plate containing the batter into the hot water chamber or steamer.

Steaming process

Steaming process

Here I should mention that I do not have any “hot-pan stand”, so I simple put the cake tin into hot water. I poured enough water so that the cake tin floats on water and do not touch the bottom of the pan.

Now steam it for 18 – 20 minutes over low flame. After that check it by inserting a knife or toothpick. If the knife or toothpick comes out clean, your Dhokla is done.

Let your dhokla cool at room temperature in the cake tin/plate to take it out on a plate.

Dhakla is ready to tamper

Dhakla is ready for tampering

Meanwhile prepare the tamarind chatni and tempering for dhokla.

For tamarind chatni heat the oil in a small sauce pan. Add mustard seeds and let them splutter, then add tamarind pulp, little bit of water, chilli powder, ginger powder/juice, salt and sugar. Boil the mixture till you get your desired consistency.

For tampering, heat the oil, add mustard seeds, let it splutter and then add green chillies & curry leaves. Saute them for a while then add water, salt and sugar. Let the mixture boil till the sugar dissolves into it and then turn the gas off.

Now cut the dhokla into square pieces and tamper it with the hot mixture just prepared.

Garnish the top of dhokla with grated coconut and serve with the tamarind chatni.

Dhokla is ready to be served

Dhokla is ready to serve

Note :

  1. Do not add all the water at a time while making the batter. Then you will end up with a batter full of lumps.
  2. After adding Eno’s fruit salt, don’t delay to transfer it into the steamer otherwise dhokla will not come out fluffy. The batter doesn’t raise while steaming, it is raised only when Eno salt is added.
  3. For the said quantity of batter, you should not take a plate/cake tin with a diameter larger than 7 inchs/18 cm. otherwise the result would be a flat dhokla.
  4. Tamarind chatni is purely optional.
  5. Try to use a “hot-plate stand” in the steamer. If you do not have that, by any means try to place the plate, containing batter, a bit higher than the water level.