Mutton & Cheese Pie

‘Pie’ is nothing but a baked dish of fruit, or meat and vegetables, typically with a top and base of pastry.

I recall to share a few posts on tarts ( Fruit Tartlets, Cherry tomato & poppy seed tartlets, Blue Cheese & Walnut Tartlets, Caramelized Lemon Tart ) in the past. Pies, which fall almost in the same category of tarts, but with a lid, are pretty interesting baked items too. Here I share with you the recipe of a savoury pie filled with mutton and cheese which also happens to be my first ever post on pie.

‘Mutton & Cheese Pie’ reminds me my good old days in Utrecht, Holland, where I got exposed to different kinds of baked items. Quite a few times I tested the savoury pies in small street-side baking shops there for which I grew an instant linking. It has been almost 4 years since I am back from Europe and after such a long time, finally managed to try one of my favourites among those pies, by my own. However, as a substitute of lamb meat, I used mutton along with Cheese, the latter being an addition and innovation from my side. One can skip adding cheese at will,  since simple mutton pies are also pretty delicious.

Mutton & Cheese Pie

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Chelo Kebab

‘Chelo Kebab’ consists of Rice or ‘Chelo’ and Kebabs or grilled meat. It is considered as the ‘national dish of Iran’. A butter flavoured rice is accompanied with ‘cubed chicken tikka’, ‘minced mutton seekh kebab’, poached egg, grilled tomato and a scoop of butter.

Few famous restaurants in Kolkata make this dish popular to all Kolkatans. Thus it becomes a worth having dish during our visit in Kolkata. If you are not willing to have a spicy mutton or chicken gravy still want to have the meat then this dish can be one of your top choices. Again rice fulfills the carbohydrate need of this protein rich dish which presents a complete meal to you.

Chelo Kebab

Chelo Kebab

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Keema Ghugni or Mangsher Ghugni (Dried Yellow Peas cooked with Mutton keema)

Ghugni is quite a popular street food in Kolkata which finds a resonance with my childhood and growing up in the city. I still have a vivid memory of the street hawkers carrying a large bowl of ghugni on the flame, roamed around the streets in the evening, calling for the buyers with a signature yell. Ghugni used to be a lucrative tiffin snack at the school gates with a piece of bread too. For those who had never heard about it, Ghugni is actually a spicy curry prepared with dried yellow peas which is  known as ‘ghugnir mator’ in Bengali. Pretty riveting in the tongue, Ghugni remains still a favourite and I use the following space to describe its recipe although slightly in a different mould. Here I will add Mutton keema in the Ghugni which makes it even more compelling for the non-vegetarians. Must admit although that is not my innovation at all. In fact ‘keema ghugni’ or ‘mangsher ghugni’ is also immensely popular in Bengal. Happy cooking.

Keema Ghugni (Dried Yellow Peas cooked with Mutton keema)

Keema Ghugni (Dried Yellow Peas cooked with Mutton keema)

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